Legislative Council

The Legislative Council is the upper house of the Victorian Parliament. Its job is to review legislation and hold the Government to account. This chamber was completed in 1856 at the same time as the Legislative Assembly. The Legislative Council is red to reflect the customs of the House of Lords in the United Kingdom.

The Legislative Council has 40 Members. It has a different voting system to the Legislative Assembly and has members from small political parties as well as members from the Government and Opposition.

 

The President sits in the chair at the front of the room and makes sure the rules of debate are followed. Behind the President is the Vice-Regal Chair. This is the chair that the Governor uses to make a speech every four years when Parliament is opened after an election.

 

There is a picture of the Usher of the Black Rod in the Chamber. The Black Rod is used in the ceremonies at the opening of a new Parliament, when the Usher knocks on the door of the Legislative Assembly to invite its members into the Legislative Council for the Governor’s Speech.

 

Around the ceiling of this chamber, a series of winged figures symbolise a range of virtues including justice, peace and wisdom.